PUBLICATIONS


“Training advisors is not an easy task. We never seem to have enough time and resources to devote to providing comprehensive, ongoing training to our advising team. As advising administrators, we are faced with managing multiple priorities related to supervising personnel, executing programs, addressing escalated student issues, and attending to the myriad of administrative functions that come with the job.” Drawing on 25+ years of academic advising experience at diverse institutions, Sue Ohrablo’s High-Impact Advising provides a comprehensive, A-Z introduction to the job–with useful tools, exercises, and assessments that can be used in individual and group training sessions for new advisors, or can be used as a refresher for ongoing training and reinforcement of practices.

Reactions to High-Impact Advising: A Guide for Academic Advisors

“I highly recommend that all academic advising professionals read High-Impact Advising: A Guide for Academic Advisors, as it will help them to enhance key skills needed to establish positive relationships with students, appropriately assess students’ needs, effectively teach students, and efficiently provide high quality service.”
Dr. Lua R. Hancock, Vice Provost, Campus Life and Student Success, Stetson University

"A student-centered, informative, and practical approach. Dr. Ohrablo presents powerful guidelines geared towards student success for 21st century academic advisors. The handbook offers indispensable information and engaging scenarios that mirror real life college instances that students experience. A key resource tool for academic advisors and higher education professionals."
Jacqueline T. Hollins, Assistant Vice Provost/Director of Academic Advisement, SUNY at Buffalo (UB)

"As a department leader in academic advisement, I would use Sue’s book as a training resource and teaching mechanism for advisors. It allows advising professionals to understand today’s complex environment of advising students, beyond just selecting courses.”
Jake Shilts, Director, Advisement & Career Services, Miami Dade College

“Advisors will reap the benefits of this well-balanced, informative guide.”
Shari Saperstein, Associate Dean, College of Undergraduate Studies, Nova Southeastern University

“Sue’s book provides quality theoretical and practical knowledge to assist advisors in their work with our students.”
Dr. Lua R. Hancock, Vice Provost, Campus Life and Student Success, Stetson University

“A student-centered, informative, and practical approach. Dr. Ohrablo presents powerful guidelines geared towards student success for 21st century academic advisors. The handbook offers indispensable information and engaging scenarios that mirror real life college instances that students experience. A key resource tool for academic advisors and higher education professionals.”
Dr. DeLaine Priest, Associate Vice President of Student Development and Enrollment Services, University of Central Florida

“I find Sue’s writing quite relevant to today’s complex advising environment and enriching to all those involved in student advising. As an advisor, this will come in handy as a window of proven practical insights, tools and method for effective advising.”
Awah Divine, Academic Advisor, Abu Dhabi University

by Susan Ohrablo (Nova Southeastern University), Author of Handbook for Academic Advisors Academic advising staff, comprised of both administrative support staff and advisors, may experience a great deal of stress and frustration as they work to manage the expectations of both students and administration. As frontline personnel, they are the first to be confronted when students experience problems and express dissatisfaction, yet they have little authority or control. By including these constituents in decision-making and planning, advising administrators are able to benefit from their diverse perspectives and maximize on the skills that each staff member brings to the department. This is particularly important because when we...

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Assessing and Meeting Student Needs Ask academic advising professionals what they perceive to be the primary role of academic advising, and you’ll most likely hear responses such as “to help students,” “to serve students,” or “to facilitate student growth and development.” All are appropriate responses which get to the most basic reason that advising departments exist; however, these objectives often remain ambiguous and ill-defined. What does “help” or “serve” look like? How is it achieved? Advising administrators need to assess the specific needs of the students whom they serve and implement a specific plan for meeting those needs. Here are three strategies for...

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by Susan Ohrablo (Nova Southeastern University) Over the past few days, three different students have made comments to the effect of, “I am so glad I called. I almost didn’t. Honestly, before I called I had pretty much decided to withdraw from the program.” By the end of my discussion with each of these students, the student decided to persist and agreed to continue a dialogue that would help them to succeed. When students are in crisis, they are most vulnerable. They are apt to make rash decisions if they feel isolated and unsupported. If they have even one person within the institution on whom they know they can rely, it may make all the difference in retaining them. Being able to have that conversation effectively...

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by Susan Ohrablo (Nova Southeastern University) Being an effective academic advisor is like being an expert juggler. It is easy to drop a ball now and then. In this article, I examine strategies to keep all the balls in the air in order to effectively support our students and help them persist toward graduation. The role of the academic advisor is complex, requiring advisors to effectively communicate with students, understand and interpret policies and procedures, follow institutional protocols, maintain student records, utilize technology, and engage in problem-solving. These activities can be categorized into three distinct skill sets: interpersonal, operational, and analytical. To deliver comprehensive advising assistance,...

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by Susan Ohrablo (Nova Southeastern University) This week marks the end of yet another hectic week filled with long days, endless phone calls, appointments, emails, and walk-ins. There are times when I get frustrated that I have to answer yet another question about when commencement invitations will be sent out or what the course number is for a particular class. This is not advising. At least, this is not the advising that keeps me motivated and makes me feel like I’m positively contributing to a student’s academic journey. However, as I look back on the past weeks, I also have to remember the student who was sobbing softly on the phone as she articulated her frustration with a professor whom she felt was harassing her, or the...

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by Susan Ohrablo (Nova Southeastern University) Ask anyone who has worked with adult students the major challenges that adult students face and they will tell you work, family, health, and finances. Each of these challenge areas poses a threat to student persistence, especially if the student has low resiliency. Academic advisors have the opportunity to help strengthen student resiliency by providing students options and tools for success. Work As employers respond to changes in the economy, they are often faced with doing more with less. The impact on employees can result in increased workload due to workforce reduction, unemployment, or reassignment of duties. Our adult students are not immune to experiencing these significant...

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by Susan Ohrablo (Nova Southeastern University) When working with students, advisors are likely to encounter students who blame others for the academic challenges they experience. It is the responsibility of the advisor to provide a sympathetic ear and refrain from judgment while creating a non-threatening environment.  The advising session should be a safe place for students to express their concerns without fear of retribution or rejection. In such an environment, students are apt to be more candid in their assessments about faculty and peers. Scenario: The Hard Professor Advisors know the reputations of many faculty members, especially those who are considered “hard” or “demanding” by students....

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