PUBLICATIONS


“Training advisors is not an easy task. We never seem to have enough time and resources to devote to providing comprehensive, ongoing training to our advising team. As advising administrators, we are faced with managing multiple priorities related to supervising personnel, executing programs, addressing escalated student issues, and attending to the myriad of administrative functions that come with the job.” Drawing on 25+ years of academic advising experience at diverse institutions, Sue Ohrablo’s High-Impact Advising provides a comprehensive, A-Z introduction to the job–with useful tools, exercises, and assessments that can be used in individual and group training sessions for new advisors, or can be used as a refresher for ongoing training and reinforcement of practices.

Reactions to High-Impact Advising: A Guide for Academic Advisors

“I highly recommend that all academic advising professionals read High-Impact Advising: A Guide for Academic Advisors, as it will help them to enhance key skills needed to establish positive relationships with students, appropriately assess students’ needs, effectively teach students, and efficiently provide high quality service.”
Dr. Lua R. Hancock, Vice Provost, Campus Life and Student Success, Stetson University

"A student-centered, informative, and practical approach. Dr. Ohrablo presents powerful guidelines geared towards student success for 21st century academic advisors. The handbook offers indispensable information and engaging scenarios that mirror real life college instances that students experience. A key resource tool for academic advisors and higher education professionals."
Jacqueline T. Hollins, Assistant Vice Provost/Director of Academic Advisement, SUNY at Buffalo (UB)

"As a department leader in academic advisement, I would use Sue’s book as a training resource and teaching mechanism for advisors. It allows advising professionals to understand today’s complex environment of advising students, beyond just selecting courses.”
Jake Shilts, Director, Advisement & Career Services, Miami Dade College

“Advisors will reap the benefits of this well-balanced, informative guide.”
Shari Saperstein, Associate Dean, College of Undergraduate Studies, Nova Southeastern University

“Sue’s book provides quality theoretical and practical knowledge to assist advisors in their work with our students.”
Dr. Lua R. Hancock, Vice Provost, Campus Life and Student Success, Stetson University

“A student-centered, informative, and practical approach. Dr. Ohrablo presents powerful guidelines geared towards student success for 21st century academic advisors. The handbook offers indispensable information and engaging scenarios that mirror real life college instances that students experience. A key resource tool for academic advisors and higher education professionals.”
Dr. DeLaine Priest, Associate Vice President of Student Development and Enrollment Services, University of Central Florida

“I find Sue’s writing quite relevant to today’s complex advising environment and enriching to all those involved in student advising. As an advisor, this will come in handy as a window of proven practical insights, tools and method for effective advising.”
Awah Divine, Academic Advisor, Abu Dhabi University

Recently, someone asked me what I perceived the role of an academic advisor to be. It has taken years of practice and refinement in order to come up with a relatively succinct answer to that question. We know we do a lot of important things for students, but when put on the spot, it can be difficult to articulate those things. I believe that the role of the academic advisor is to help engage students in thoughtful, proactive academic planning, decision making, goal setting, and problem resolution. Anticipating students’ needs is a critical component of effective academic advising. By providing answers to unasked questions and offering support and direction even when the student does not perceive a need, advisors can maximize...

Read More

Over the past few years, institutions have been experiencing declining enrollment and are looking to strategically attract and retain more students. In order to do so, institutions have developed programs and initiatives to reach out to students, and student support professionals have experienced an increased focus on the need to retain their students. Academic advisors can play a critical role in promoting students success and, as a result, help to retain them. Students who feel connected to an institution, feel cared about, understand their purpose, and have clear academic and career goals are more apt to persist in their academic endeavors. Academic advisors can assist students in the areas of engagement, academic planning,...

Read More

Authored by: Sue Ohrablo This article is based upon a presentation by the author at the 2010 NACADA annual conference in Orlando, FL Overview Today’s advisors are faced with increasing student loads, decreasing resources, and a seemingly unending parade of students needing their assistance. The students with whom they work expect immediate responses and answers to their questions. A common reaction by advisors is to allow student expectations to shape their response to them and deliver the immediate information students seek (Smith, 2002). Advisors often find themselves feeling pulled between wanting to deliver comprehensive, developmental advising (Appleby, 2008) and managing the demands of student loads and expectations....

Read More

by Susan Ohrablo (Nova Southeastern University) As we begin another academic year, advisors can start to breathe a little easier now that most of the fires have been put out, questions have been answered, schedule adjustments have been made, and students are mostly settled into their classes. The anxiety that accompanies long, fast-paced days may begin to dissipate. During this time, advisors are left scratching their heads, asking themselves, “Why can’t these students register themselves?”; “Why does this student continue to check with me even though I already gave her the information?”; and, even, on the worst days, “What is wrong with these students?” As things calm down, I encourage...

Read More

Authored by: Sue Ohrablo, Ed.D. Students who seek to earn their degrees in an online format are at higher risk for attrition than are their campus-based counterparts (Morris & Finnegan, 2009). Because online students often experience feelings of isolation and anxiety, they can greatly benefit from a positive, supportive, ongoing relationship with an academic advisor (Ludwig-Hardman & Dunlap, 2003). Academic advisors play a critical role in supporting and engaging students (Nutt, 2003). Students rely on advisors for academic information, assistance in navigating the university, locating and understanding policies and procedures, and problem-solving and decision-making (Smith & Allen, 2014). While a campus-based...

Read More

“Training advisors is not an easy task. We never seem to have enough time and resources to devote to providing comprehensive, ongoing training to our advising team. As advising administrators, we are faced with managing multiple priorities related to supervising personnel, executing programs, addressing escalated student issues, and attending to the myriad of administrative functions that come with the job.” Drawing on 25+ years of academic advising experience at diverse institutions, Sue Ohrablo’s High-Impact Advising provides a comprehensive, A-Z introduction to the job–with useful tools, exercises, and assessments that can be used in individual and group training sessions for new advisors, or can be used as a refresher for...

Read More

Authored by, Sue Ohrablo Academic advisors are relied upon to answer questions, deliver information, provide resources, and interpret policies for students. Comprehensive developmental advising goes well beyond these transactions (Ohrablo, 2010), as advisors can significantly contribute to a student’s success and development by engaging students in academic planning, as well as facilitating decision-making, goal-setting, and problem resolution. In order to engage students in comprehensive developmental advising, advisors must establish trust and rapport with their students (Fox, 2008). Components to building trust and rapport include availability, responsiveness, reliability, knowledge, effectiveness, advocacy, caring, and...

Read More

by Susan Ohrablo (Nova Southeastern University) Currently, higher education institutions are facing a crisis with declining enrollment and student attrition. Higher education professionals are being tasked with student retention on a system-wide level. With the issuing of this directive, student service professionals are scrambling to find ways to outreach to, engage, and retain their students. While formal assessment is important in identifying why students leave and how we can better retain them, there is value in informal assessment, as well. Front-line personnel such as academic advisors, counselors, and student success coaches can identify reasons for student departure as an outcome of their daily interactions with...

Read More

by Susan Ohrablo (Nova Southeastern University) Online students are at significant risk for attrition as they experience isolation and a sense of disconnect from the institution, as well as find themselves lacking resources and information. Advisors can greatly impact students’ perceptions of their online experience by providing ongoing support and information to students. Advising online students can be challenging, however, as academic advisors are responsible for providing quality advising to students they may never meet, relying on phone and electronic communication as an alternative to face-to-face advising. Advisors who have traditionally worked with students in a face-to-face environment may experience frustration,...

Read More

Over the past few days, three different students have made comments to the effect of, “I am so glad I called. I almost didn’t. Honestly, before I called I had pretty much decided to withdraw from the program.” By the end of my discussion with each of these students, the student decided to persist and agreed to continue a dialogue that would help them to succeed. When students are in crisis, they are most vulnerable. They are apt to make rash decisions if they feel isolated and unsupported. If they have even one person within the institution on whom they know they can rely, it may make all the difference in retaining them. Being able to have that conversation effectively with an at-risk student at the most critical...

Read More